Are male patients comfortable with women doctors?

  | August 25, 2017

Are men less enthusiastic than women about seeing physicians of the opposite gender? Maybe, according to an analysis of more than 2 million primary care visits.

The study, which tracked patient visits on the athenahealth network between January and June 2014, looked at how many patients during that time frame returned to a new practice within 18 months of their first visits.

male patients uncomfortable with female physicians

Roughly half of the patients returned within that time if they shared their physicians' gender. Women returned to male doctors at nearly the same rate. But only 40 percent of male patients returned to their female doctors.

The pattern was particularly true for patients with commercial insurance. While 52 percent of commercially insured male patients returned to their male physicians, only 40 percent returned to female physicians. For commercially insured women, return rates were 51 percent for female physicians and 48 percent for male physicians.

Medicaid was the only insurance type that showed no difference in return rates for men based on the gender of the physician.

The problem doesn't appear to be related to the quality of care that male patients are receiving: A 2017 MedStatix/athenaHealth survey of 40,000 patients showed that men who saw female physicians gave those providers slightly higher ratings than those who saw male physicians.

So, what is the problem? Women have long been accustomed to male doctors – even now, only about a third of practicing physicians are female. Male patients, meanwhile, have expressed reservations about visiting women doctors for some time.

In particular, male patients seem uncomfortable with female physicians' use of chaperones during office visits. Long a common practice when female patients see male physicians, chaperones are meant to make patients feel more at ease during intimate examinations and prevent inappropriate behavior (and false charges of inappropriate behavior) from either party.

However, chaperons can make patients more uncomfortable – male patients in particular are overwhelmingly opposed to any third party in the room, particularly a female chaperone – and most chaperones are female. (For more on the topic, see Chaperones in the exam room -- who gets to decide?

This issue isn't likely to resolve itself soon. Almost half of new medical school graduates are women, and they will represent a growing proportion of the cohort of physicians who are accepting new patients.

One glimmer of optimism: In a recent exchange on quora.com, male patients expressed their preference for female physicians on a number of bases, including superior listening skills and — for certain sensitive procedures — a lighter physical touch.

E.M. Gardner is a writer based in Chicago. Additional reporting by Lia Novotny.

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Men here in the United States have by some sick misguided health care industry tradition been medically under served by the system that’s supposed to be taking care of them for years now. Just look at the disparity that exists between Women’s Health Care Centers that are staff with an all-female staff to care for women’s needs only and Men’s Health Care Centers that are staff with an all-male staff to care for men’s needs only. The balance is tilted heavily in favor of women’s health care as you’ll find very few true men’s health care clinics in this country. This inequality in care can be traced back partially to society’s views of men and women. Through the years, our society and more importantly the US healthcare industry has viewed men as being tough, confident, strong, accomplished individuals who are non-conforming, aggressive, and leaders. One who never dares to show any sign of weakness. At the same time through the years women have been viewed as being warm, emotional, kind, polite, sensitive, gentle, soft, and a follower. So doctor’s offices, imaging centers, clinics, and hospitals all took this view (as antiquated as it is today), and used it to develop the manner in which they treat their patients. This method started back in the early 20th century and is still unfortunately in use today. What they decided was that women being as they were warm, emotional, kind, and polite have modesty issues that needed to be protected. Since they are also so sensitive creatures, their dignity needed to be respected. At the same time they came up with this reasoning for women, they somehow decided that since men were these tough, strong, non-conforming, and aggressive individuals, they couldn’t possibly have modesty issues, or need their dignity respected. So with that mindset in place, they developed what can only be called a diabolical plan by which to run their business. For years, the US healthcare system has been playing a two-faced game on the public they are supposed to be serving. It’s time to put an end to the game and call them on the carpet for doing it. Out of one side of their mouth they tell the public they serve that they are an “equal opportunity employer”. While at the same time, out of the other side of their mouth they hire female staff only for doctor’s offices, imaging centers, clinics, and hospitals. Their logic to this madness is they hire only women so as to protect a woman’s privacy and dignity in areas such as mammography and labor and delivery. These same female nurses and technicians can also take care of the medical needs of both sexes at the same time. That, is what we and male techs and nurses trying to get hired would call discrimination. Ah, but the medical community has yet another card up their slimy sleeve to play if their hiring practice is challenged in court. They tell the courts they claim what is called a bona fide occupational qualification defense (BFOQ). What they are telling the courts is it is reasonably necessary for them to hire female workers only to support the normal operation of the business. Their defense is bogus because it cannot stand up to two very important tests. 1. Take away a woman’s right to her privacy since men don’t have it to begin with and level the playing field to start. Now, the medical community could hire an equally qualified male nurse or technician who could step in and do just as good a job as the female. They fail test 1. 2. Test two and more importantly, the “Patient’s Bill of Rights” that’s hanging in the lobby of almost every healthcare institution in this country. There are two lines of interest on the one hanging in the lobby of a hospital nearby. Every person has the right to Personal privacy and the confidentiality of your medical record. Every person has the right to be treated with dignity. Two words “Every person” That doesn’t mean they protect the privacy and respect the dignity of just females. “Every person” means BOTH men and women have their privacy protected and their dignity respected. With that in mind, I ask you how is that our healthcare industry is being allowed to get away with this when a man seeking some privacy for an intimate male related exam, test, or procedure cannot ask for and get same gender caregivers? Since they cannot pass the test, the healthcare industry should NOT be allowed to use this defense in court. What they are doing is trading men’s lives for dollars. It’s time men started playing their “NO TRADE” card. The problem has gone on far too long and it’s time to do whatever it takes to put a stop to it and move the equality scales back to the middle where they belong. There are men today who have temperaments that are soft & gentle. Guys that like to cook and are often bombarded by their peers for not being charismatic and extroverted. It’s time for the healthcare industry to throw out their old stale views on how people are supposed to act and join the 21st century. Our country is in the process of crafting a new healthcare bill for the country. Gentlemen, it’s time to put your fears of speaking up because you are afraid of retribution from some loud mouth nurse aside and speak in a loud clear voice to the people in Washington that you want equality in the next healthcare bill. Next time you have something related to intimate care, don’t be afraid of pushing back at any facility and ask for male caregivers if that’s what you want. Don’t let them bring in a chaperone without you prior approval. If they do, stop everything at that point, tell everyone to leave so you can get dressed, then leave and report the facility. If they can satisfy you “tell them” you’ll take your business to a facility that will take care of you the way you CHOOSE. Guys, talk to your insurance company. You pay them top dollar in premiums. Make them work for it. Senior citizens, check with AARP. Tell them if women have the right to choose, so should men. See if they will join the fight. Don’t just keep saying to yourself and everyone else that “it is what it is”. It’s NOT. If men stop being wooses and start speaking up. They will have to listen! If you don’t want to do it for yourself, think about your brother, or your son and DO IT FOR THEM! Thanks for listening. Best regards, John
Name: 
John
Email: 
raffie326@gmail.com
Here's my take. Recently I have had several exams by a female doctor accompanied by a female chaperone. I am embarrassingly small (you know where.) If I were erect, I would not mind but this situation makes it worse. Are there any suggestions to make me feel better about this?
Name: 
Steve
Email: 
stephenholinka@yahoo.com
It is too late to undo what you have experienced, but you can switch to a male doctor going forward. It is the path of least resistance rather than trying to get the female doctor to treat you with respect. The other thing you can do is send a message to the female doctor telling her that the presence of a female chaperone embarrassed you, and that you are switching to a male doctor. Be polite and professional in how you say it, but do say it. Maybe she'll re-think her chaperone policy going forward.
Name: 
RLU
Email: 
bunderhill53@gmail.com
Yes Steve, easy answer. Stop seeing this female doctor, if she chooses to bring in another female. If you keep going, she will keep doing it. They probably don't have a "Male" Chaperone working in the office, and probably have no intentions of ever hiring one. The only way they will; is if men, when encountered with this set up, look the female doctor in the eyes, and say, " The exam is over" because this 2-female set up in my exam makes me feel very uncomfortable. Then ask her, if she goes to a Male Doctor, for HER intimate female exams, and if her Male doctor brings in another male to be her Chaperone. Ask her if SHE would feel comfortable with it. I bet any amount of money she see's a female doctor herself, and wouldn't accept a male chaperone during HER pap smears, or breast exams. They will continue to keep doing it if you don't complain. And I really am convinced that they don't actually care about your embarrassment or modesty, if they do it to you in the first place. The situation is really all in your control... in what to allow to happen in that exam room.
Name: 
Jim
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
Jim, Like you said, turn it against her and ask if she would like a male doctor and a male chaperone in the room. You know she wouldn't like that but doesn't think that men don't like it either. I can say that here in Wyoming where I live, I've never heard of a chaperone having to accompany a doctor, even a female doctor. I've gone to a female P.A in the past because a male doctor wasn't available at the time to have an annual physical (my physicals are just the blood work) but she didn't have a chaperone. She didn't ask if I wanted any of the intimate exams. I wouldn't have let her do them anyway. Being a P.A maybe they're not to do those exams on men out here, I never did ask.
Name: 
Jesse Stone
Email: 
jesse.stone307@yahoo.com
Steve: If you are going to the doctor for something male related, before anything gets started tell the doctor no chaperones. If they say one is required, you reply the chaperone must be male. If they have no males on staff, you then have to make the decision to go forward or stop, leave and find a new doctor who will work with you. Regards, John
Name: 
John
Email: 
Raffie326@gmail.com
Steve: Tell the doctor you prefer no chaperone be present for intimate exam. If not possible ask that the chaperone be male. If they can't accommodate you your only other choice is find a doctor who will work with you. Regards, John
Name: 
John
Email: 
Raffie326@gmail.com
Having a chaperone is completely useless, it's just another person in the room standing around doing nothing but gawking at you. And, they bill for that too. TV shows are partially to blame as to how women treat men in the health system. It shows female doctors and nurses treating men like crap and doing what ever they want with them. If they showed female patients being treated like they treat men, they would scream bloody murder so loud that the earth would wobble out of orbit.
Name: 
Jesse Stone
Email: 
jesse.stone307@yahoo.com
Jesse. Women have been yelling at the medical community for years and the system has listened. You won't see a male tech giving a woman a mammogram. Rarely will you see a male RN in L&D either. You see new women's healthcare clinics going up all over the country. Why, because women found their voice and spoke up. You rarely hear much less read about a men's clinic going up. Why is that? It's because men don't want to be seen as being weak so rather than open their mouths & tell the medical community that this is unacceptable they allow the system to rip their dignity away from them and leave them feeling totally embarrassed and humiliated. Urology is where men should take a stand and take back what the medical community stole from every man that walked through their doors. It isn't the way it has to be if every man can find the courage to find his voice & tell them you require same gender care for intimate exams, tests, and procedures. If they say not possible you push back. Tell them, you'll take your case to a facility that works with their male patients and you'll let others know how unfriendly they are towards male patients. If women can force change to the system, why can't men? We're not a bunch of wusses. We're human beings. We just like our female counterparts have the right to choose who is part of our medical team. It's time the medical establishment gave us our dues. If you want to be treated like objects that they talk and joke about then don't say anything. If you want your dignity intact from the time you enter a facility until you leave, it's time to SPEAK UP! Urology is the key domino. Topple that area and the others will fall in place. Change is never easy but this change is long overdue. It's up to you. Be needlessly exposed in front of women you don't know but you can rest assure will pass on all about their interaction with you. Or, have same gender care and have a dignified peaceful visit. It's up to you guys! Regards, John
Name: 
John
Email: 
Raffie326@gmail.com
when men complain we are dismissed as weirdo's etc
Name: 
opt out
Email: 
jloptout@gmail.com
I've developed a set of contingency plans, with the help of my therapist. If I'm ever seeing a new doctor, I will arrange what's called an "establish care" visit, to discuss my own strict no-chaperone policy BEFORE any exam or procedure takes place. If I'm ever in another ambush situation, I will tell the spectator to leave, then explain my personal history and ask the doctor to waive her or his "chaperone" requirement. If they're not willing, I'll ask them to switch with a colleague so that I don't have to reschedule. If that's not possible and I do have to reschedule or go elsewhere, I'll ask for a refund of any copays and also report the incomplete encounter to my insurance company. Like RLU, my current PCP believes that male providers typically don't require "chaperones" for male patients, but it seems that malpractice insurers and medical attorneys are strongly advising ALL providers to require witnesses for all intimate encounters, whether with same-sex or opposite-sex patients.
Name: 
Anonymous
Email: 
guthfamily1@hotmail.com
You have the right to refuse any doctor or nurse that you do not feel comfortable with, you must speak up.And a chaperone is a joke, they may even be an office worker or secretary not in the medical field at all.Humiliation is devastating,and it's real.
Name: 
Bob Haagen
Email: 
keybook6@gmail.com
You didn't cite any sources or research for female chaperones being an issue. Is that purely anecdotal? Also, it doesn't make the article look good that there are several typos...
Name: 
Becky
Email: 
rebecca.velasco@corvallisclinic.com
Becky, I am not sure if you were addressing my comment as above, or addressing the entire forum, but the entry of more and more woman into the medical workforce as nurses, and Nurse Practitioners, and doctors, has been a growing concern for male patients for quite some time. The medical schools need to change their standards and teaching practices to deal with the respect and modesty of male patients. One example I can give is the use of Female Doctors, NPs and nurses hired by school districts, in High School and middle school Male sport physicals. This practice in my opinion is very alarming. Reason being is this is a very impressionable age in boys lives, and males in particular in these exams are forced to full male exposure. Girls in the same sports physicals are not required to nudity at all, even though it is documented that girls can get hernia's as well and why they aren't checked in the same manner as boys is perplexing. Hernia checks for boys via dropping of pants, to a female doctor, and female nurse (chaperone) can be very embarrassing to boys, especially when most of them have never even been In the presence of a woman sexually. I have personally talked to my friends in school in the past that have said "I would go out for sports, but I'm not dropping my pants in front of the school Nurse" (Now add a female doctor to the mix) There is an excellent article by a medical doctor on this issue. Don't just take my opinion on the issue, Male Doctors have the same opinion regarding females in male intimate exams. http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2011/08/sports-physicals-includes-provisions-privacy.html
Name: 
JIm
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
Here in Wyoming, school nurses aren't permitted to do sports physicals, not only would the kids not allow that but us parents wouldn't put up with it either, they're done by the family's own doctors. Things are done much differently out here
Name: 
Jesse Stone
Email: 
jesse.stone307@yahoo.com
Jesse, however does the school allow Female Doctors to the exams as many other school districts have done or are currently doing? If so, the school nurse could easily be asked to be a chaperon. This would place middle school and high school boys in t e presence of 2 females in the exam. We had a male doctor doing our sports physicals growing up in school, and the school nurse (female) was present in the room, when we had to drop our shorts and cough. She had first hand sight standing no more than 3 to 4 feet from us and stood right there looking down at our privates as each one of us did it, holding on to a clipboard checking us off. this would NEVER be allowed for girls with a male doctor, and male nurse. In fact, girls don't have to expose anything during those exams. For that reason it would make PERFECT sense to have a male doctor do the exam for both genders.
Name: 
Jim
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
Hi Jim, Your article about schools and nudity reminds me of reading about some of the junior and senior high schools like in Chicago, Texas, Michigan, and some other areas that in the 60s that made it mandatory that the boys had to swim nude in gym class with females that had to swim with suits on. I think this was one big turning point in the advancement of destroying the modesty, dignaty, and respect to boys and men. It seemed like a good idea at that time period when the boys could swim nude at school when it was just the boys. The problem was it was mandatory for boys to swim naked. The much larger problem got introduced when the schools started letting the girls in to swim with them and they were required to wear swim suits. That was just the biginning of the humiliation of boys. It would have been a totally different situation if the girls were required to swim nude as well but that wasn't going to happen, they were allowed to humiliate boys but not the girls. The second stage to further humiliate the boys in during the meets, they started letting the mothers, aunts, sisters, and even the female classmates in to watch them swim naked. These are the same girl classmates that were in their math and english classes together. I'm sure that the girls weren't there to watch the swimming, they were there to check out and perv on the naked boys. Another problem was photographers were allowed into the area where the boys were showering and put the photo in public magazines like Life magazine. It's no wonder why ithe nude swimming had to come to a stop in the early 70s because the humiliation and the perving on the school age boys was spiraling out of control. Nobody back in that day seemed to have made much of a fuss about the boys swimming nude but if the school tried to make it mandatory that the girls swim nude in front of the boys, the women of that day would have been screaming bloody murder so loud that the earth would have wobbled out of orbit. I've heard a few lame excusses why they had to make it madatory for boys to swim naked. The first lame excuse was that the swim trunks were causing a problem with the hygiene of the pool. Well, if that was a problem, why did the girls wear swim suits?? Another stupid idea for it was that the girls needed to see what the boys had to rid themselves of their curiosity. I can't recal if that statement was from a Dear Abby column or that was from a school. There is no mention that the boys have a curiosity about the girls and that's why the girls should swim naked!!! I recall listening to a sound bite of a guy that was in high school in the 60s and he said that at times the coach couldn't make it so the school would just put a female substitute teacher in to perv on the boys. Talk about absolutely no dignity or respect for the boys. The policy should have been if a female was going to fill in for the male coach, she had to be naked with the boys, that would have stopped that perving crap dead in it's tracks.
Name: 
Jesse Stone
Email: 
jesse.stone307@yahoo.com
Can you imagine the outcry that would go out if women were forced like their male counterparts to endure opposite gender care for their intimate exams? Women would have to take the luck of the draw like men do. Their mammograms could be done by male x-ray techs. Hiring practices must be changed to force the healthcare industry to stop making excuses and start hiring an EQUAL number of male & female nurses, and techs. Lawsuits look to be the only way they will listen as to date they refuse to acknowledge the issue exists. Once a lawsuit is filed, all their dirty laundry will be exposed and the public will finally see these people for who they really are. The 5 nurses in Denver and the debacle in Pittsburgh are only the tip of the iceberg. The flood gates need to be opened and the public made aware of the way these so-called professionals (I refer to them simply as healthcare employees. As far as I'm concerned they are not professionals at all), treat patients. It's time for Lady Justice to weigh in and re-balance the scales of healthcare in this country. Both men and women need to put their fears aside and speak up when they aren't comfortable with their treatment. Nobody should have to put up with "drop your pants, you don't have anything we haven't already seen before." The system doesn't need people like these and the industry has proven beyond any shadow of a doubt, it needs help from the public to get rid of them. regards, John
Name: 
John
Email: 
raffie326@gmail.com
As a male patient, I find being examined by a female physician far less embarrassing than with a male physician. I also feel that a female appears more sensitive, a more intent listener and more easy to confide in regarding intimacy concerns and issues of dysfunction. Becoming "aroused" has never been a problem.
Name: 
George
Email: 
gwood1046@aol.com
George, what you describe is exactly how a "patient" should feel, despite gender of the doctor. However, this is not the golden case. Many men have issues regarding (down below) who really feel more comfortable talking with a man about issues. And there is nothing wrong with that. Some men, will accept a physical/exam with a woman doctor, PROVIDONG she doesn't break that trust, by ambushing the man with ANOTHER female chaperone. I think the MAJORITY of complaints in this very IMPORTANT website, from men, is when that happens. The female doctor knows damn well that the same gender chaperon is SUPPOSED to be provided for the patient, but knows she only has FEMALE chaperones, and attempts to get the man to accept the female chaperone to get through the exam, through the ambush technique. This is really DISRESPECTFUL of the male patient, when the knock on the door comes, and 2 female walk in. Let me state that this situation would NEVER EVER happen to a woman. Male Doctors are MUCH smarter than to place a woman in that situation. It is about time Woman doctors do the same. Pressure on doctors practices to provide MALE CHAPERONES for male patients is the ONLY ANSWER !!!!!!!!!!!! I still cannot believe a female doctor would have the (balls) to think a male patient would be OK with an ambush. Female doctors need to COMMUNICATE in the least........... Sir, I need to have a chaperone in this exam... I will be bringing in another female technician to be in the exam. I will place barriers so that she will not be able to see your privates. IS THIS OK WITH YOU? THAT IS WHAT MOST MALES really want......................... is this too much to ask ?????
Name: 
JIM
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
There's a wide variance in patient preferences. Having suffered one ambush (female NP with female nurse), I can't stomach the idea of any "chaperone," male or female. The idea of someone in the room whose sole function is to watch is embarrassing and degrading to me.
Name: 
RG
Email: 
guthfamily1@hotmail.com
George, I agree with you. I both have (and prefer) a female doctor. She's is compassionate, detailed, never rushes when answering my questions, makes me feel comfortable and eases my embarrassment when I'm exposed. Her nurses and office staff, all women, are all great, too. Even though it's still embarrassing, I find it much less awkward being examined by a female medical provider. I'd rather feel a little embarrassed than feel quite awkward, uneasy and uncomfortable. My colorectal surgeon is also female. On some visits, the female nurse practitioner has reviewed my symptoms and general health (vitals, etc.) before the doctor came in. On two occasions once I was undressed the nurse practitioner returned into the exam room with the doctor and stayed there observing and taking notes as I was examined. I wasn't exactly told that would happen. It's an embarrassing exam anyway no matter who is in the room. But I didn't mind the n.p. being there by necessity. It's not like she called in the female receptionist for a show and tell. Nurses and nurse practitioner are taking over more duties that in the past were done by doctors. It's of course about time and money, but that's just the way it is.
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
PV, as long as the male patent is comfortable with having a female chaperone and a female doctor - fine, HOWEVER, the main focus I think of all male patient concerns is being able to chose WHO IS IN THEIR EXAM. Your experience isn't always the case, A lot of men DON'T feel comfortable in this situation. In all reality, this isn't right. How many woman would consent to 2 males in her exam during a breast exam or a vaginal exam ?? EXACTLY. - The overwhelming MAJORITY would say HELL NO. Then why would the medical world think a man would want two females in his exam? Answer - most men want to speak with a MAN. They share the SAME parts. Duh???? Not too many men want to discuss their private issues with 2 woman present. I genuinely hope the medical industry gets more sensitive to mens issues. The matter of life and death is at the forefront. Why not give men the forum behind closed doors to get their medical needs met? Your brother, father, boyfriend. etc. GIVE US WHAT WE WANT and STOP the ambush issue.
Name: 
JIM
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
Jim, I do not really care much for the whole idea of chaperones, period. I understand WHY the practice of using chaperones is increasing. Lawsuits. Principally because of some male doctors inappropriate behavior towards female patients. In the interest of so-called fairness, female doctors have begun using them. It may also be an insurance issue that requires them to do so. Since nurses, NPs, scribes and other medical office staff are overwhelming female, but patient population is about 50/50, it's more likely or not that a chaperone will be female regardless of the sex of the patient. But I don't want is a male chaperone forced upon me just because some, many or most men might feel uncomfortable with two (or more) women in the room while he is exposed. You said, "as long as the male patent is comfortable with having a female chaperone and a female doctor - fine." That's where it should end. But then you added, "Your experience isn't always the case, A lot of men DON'T feel comfortable in this situation. In all reality, this isn't right. How many woman would consent to 2 males in her exam during a breast exam or a vaginal exam ?? EXACTLY. ..." You added, "why would the medical world think a man would want two females in his exam? Answer - most men want to speak with a MAN. They share the SAME parts. Duh???? Not too many men want to discuss their private issues with 2 woman present." I feel it goes back to patient choice. I have chosen to prefer a female doctor. There is nothing wrong with that. It's not a right or wrong issue as you are claiming it is. It has nothing to do that she and I don't share similar equipment. It's a patient choice issue. And if in making that choice it means that she sometimes has another female in the room while I am exposed, then so be it. I would prefer no chaperone at all, but if a chaperone is going to be in the room I prefer the chaperone be female as well. In my physician's case, all her office staff happens to be female. So any time there is a chaperone, nurse or scribe in the room, I know it will be a woman. But what I don't want is for the medical community to assume that just because I am a male that I want a male nurse or tech handling my genitals or standing there as an observer while my female doctor checks my scrotum or gives me a DRE. The issue of chaperones should be centered strictly on patient choice. One suggestion could be for patients to specify on their in-take form whether they want a chaperone present during intimate exams and to also specify the sex(es) of the chaperone that is acceptable to them. If a male patient notes he prefers no chaperones, but that if there is one used anyway then the office should schedule his appointment accordingly or inform him in advance that the office has no male chaperones are available, leaving him the choice whether to seek another physician or consent to having a woman in the exam room as a chaperone (regardless of the sex of the doctor). However, if I mark that I prefer no chaperone, but that only female chaperones are acceptable if the office uses them anyway then that request should be honored.
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
PV, I can easily comment to your post. If you want a female doctor, and a female chaperone, then that is your choice. And because the medical work is increasing its female population, your request will be EASILY accommodated. HOWEVER, what about the guys who are NOT comfortable with 2 woman? By all medical rights, the patient should be given the chaperone choice they want, not be forced to accept a situation where his chaperon is female if he doesn't want it. He has the right to say no. To me, not getting the chaperone of the patients choice is DISRESPECTFUL of the patients modesty and patients rights. Im happy you are happy with your choice, but I also advocate to the men who don't like to be ambushed, and to hell with female doctors who think all men are comfortable with bringing in another female to view his genitals and place him in a situation where he has to expose himself and feel uncomfortable, and should accept it.
Name: 
Jim
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
Jim, I don't have any disagreement with anything in your post of 2/24/18. As you said "not getting the chaperone of the patient's choice is DISRESPECTFUL" to the patient. I would only take it one step further and say that it should not be assumed that just because a patient is male that he necessarily prefers that only a male chaperone or male nurse be present. A patient should not have to explain the reasons for his or her choice and nothing should be inferred from that choice.
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
As a male, I have always had a strong preference for male doctors. But for several years I had a young female doctor. I thought she was as good as they come, and my health is more important than gender. I have since returned to a male doctor, due to insurance issues. I will see a female doctor for an acute problem as scheduling is sometimes an issue, so I take what is available. But my current male doctor is highly qualified and I will stay with him.
Name: 
Male patient
Email: 
malepatient@aollll.com
I feel better being examined by a female doctor, they take the time to explain things and very compassionate, I am not afraid of discussing my male problems with her, if I get an erection I would feel better it happen with a female then a male. just me.
Name: 
Lane
Email: 
lane-widener@bellsouth.net
Hi Jim, I guess I didn't answer your last question a couple of months ago. The schools out here don't have any say or jurisdiction over the sports physicals. The physicals are done at the families own doctors office, not at the schools. As I've said before, things are done much differently out here.
Name: 
Jesse Stone
Email: 
jesse.stone@yahoo.com
The article states that women who are physicians are perceived as being better communicators with their patients, listen well to their patients and generally empathize with their patients better than their male colleagues. It seems though something is wrong---for if these points were indeed the case, why then would that same physician fail to communicate with her patient regarding his modesty concerns---why would she miss that? Is it possible that these attributes, just as the idea that men are not naturally modest is simply a myth as well? A person who communicates, listens and empathizes with their patient would have a clear understanding of the vulnerabilities of an intimate exam and would not hesitate to communicate with their patient to arrive at a mutual solution. A physician who doesn’t, loses the patients trust, and once lost, may not be given a chance to win it back.
Name: 
James
Email: 
jjodonnell@salisbury.edu
I think the writer should have cited more data from the study or linked to a copy (can't find it) on the net. I seriously doubt the study of over two million office visits during a two year period was done to come up with just four statistics. The author wrote: "The problem doesn't appear to be related to the quality of care that male patients are receiving... So, what is the problem? ... In particular, male patients seem uncomfortable with female physicians' use of chaperones during office visits." Was that question asked in the study? If so, was that cited as a reason for male patients not returning to female doctors? In what numbers? What about the non-returning male patients? What percentage saw a new female physician, male physician or no one at all? Did the study look at the return rate by age groups, race, income level or religion? The article said the date in the study looked at "new patients"in the network and their return visit rates. Did the study look at existing doctor/patient relationships as well? Is there a demographic difference between those numbers? Seems to me the author came up with pure conjecture about female chaperones in the room (meaning an exposed male patient ending up in the presence of two clothed females) being the reason the return rate to female physicians was lower, perhaps based on mere anecdotal evidence. Otherwise, if the study did provide data as to the reasons that one number (male patients returning to female physicians at a lower rate than to male physicians), why not cite it? The author wrote, "Medicaid was the only insurance type that showed no difference in return rates for men based on the gender of the physician." OK, then what were those rates? What could have been the reasons for no difference? All in all, a very poor article about a study, since it barely talked about the actual study and engaged in mere speculation.
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
As I've said before, the inappropriate female chaperone thing wouldn't happen if men would stop going to female doctors. If men for some odd reason feel they want to go to a female doctor for the intamite exams, speak up and insist that nobody else is going to be in the room. If they try to insist, get up and walk out, you DON'T have to tolerate inappropriate behavior. You're paying the bill, YOU decide how things will go, NOT them!!! Women don't put up with inappropriate behavior from male doctors, so men don't have to tolerate it from females either. You have a powerful voice, use it!!!
Name: 
Jesse Stone
Email: 
jesse.stone@yahoo.com
Jesse, I agree with the notion that a patient (male or female) should be able to insist on having a chaperone present. But I also understand why some female doctors may want a chaperone present (or be required to have one by their medical malpractice insurers) while examining a male patient (no doubt insurers aren't allowed to show prejudice in their contracts). And I do support allowing a patient (male or female) to choose the sex of the chaperone that they feel most comfortable with if one is available (or to otherwise reschedule when one is or, as you suggested, choose a different practitioner that doesn't use chaperones). However, the simple presence of a female chaperone (or female nurse) looking on while a naked male patient is examined by a female doctor with perhaps the additional presence of a young female scribe (situations that I've routinely been in) is not anymore "inappropriate" than if it were a male chaperone looking on with a young male scribe also present regardless of the sex of the doctor. Nor is the argument that most women wouldn't tolerate a male doctor bringing in a male chaperone while examining her a good one, either. That's like saying male and female patients should be treated equally as far as their privacy is concerned and that would be a self-defeating argument resulting in required chaperones for male patients regardless of the sex of the doctor since female patients routinely must accept chaperones when examined by a male doctor. Most male patients prefer NO ONE else be in the room during intimate exam. Some guys are even more uncomfortable being naked with a male chaperone lingering around than having additional women in the room. There are many reasons for this. You said, "If men for some odd reason feel they want to go to a female doctor for the intimate exams..." It's not for some "odd" reason. Just one’s preference. I simply would not feel comfortable having my genitals handled and examined by a male doctor. Nor would I feel comfortable having a male in the room looking on while a female doctor handled and examined my genitals. I'd prefer that no one else be present during my examinations by female doctors but I tolerate and accept the additional embarrassment of having other females routinely being in the room because, to me, that is preferable than the alternatives. Those of us who prefer female doctors, including for intimate care (my general practitioner, urologist, colorectal surgeon and physical therapist are all women) shouldn't have to explain ourselves for our reasoning or have it viewed as "odd" any more than a male patient be questioned who prefers seeing only male doctors or having male nurses. It really should all be about patient comfort and his or her personal preferences without having to explain or justify them. Nothing more. Nothing less.
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
Some issues should be faced when the doctor is initially selected. I chose a female dermatologist (very well qualified) because I have a skin cancer problem that dates back a number of years. I need a full-body scan every six months. I have no problem stripping nude for her, and she has found a couple of growths that needed hospital removal. She is married, a different race, and 25 years younger than me. All patients, however, have personal comfort limits. I am heterosexual and don't want a gay doctor examining me in the nude. When trust is developed, the relationship should be positive. I feel badly for those who have had negative experiences. Each situation is unique.
Name: 
Ken
Email: 
kepler.k@yahoo.com
Ken, would you feel the same way, if after you stripped, she left the room, re-knocked and brought in another female into your exam, to whom you never met before, and had her stand there with a clipboard or ipad, seeing you naked? This happened to me, during my exam with a female doctor. What was once a comfortable trusting situation, was now a very uncomfortable and weird, awkward situation. This would NOT EVER happen with a female patient, so why in the hell would any female doctor expect a man to accept it without recourse? This happens ALL THE TIME. Curious to your answer.
Name: 
Jim
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
All of the men in these comments complaining about a woman in the room observing them exposed while his doctor examines him have directed their anger at female doctors. But nothing has been said about male doctors who do nothing different. Jesse Stone says male patients wishing to avoid the embarrassment of having a woman seeing them naked should only see male doctors. I submit doing that guarantees no such thing. A 2017 article in BizWest ("Doc gets more patient time with scribe at the keyboard") discusses the increasingly use of scribes (basically a glorified note taker who will very likely be a young woman) being in the room while a patient is examined. The article, with photos, shows an attractive young woman in her early to mid 20s working in the office of Dr. John Bender. The articles states: Bender often fields colleagues’ questions about scribes, such as, “Will you excuse a female scribe when doing sensitive work on a male patient?” He answers, “No, I don’t.”
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
PV, there is a simple solution to doctors ( male or female ) who use young female scribes in the doctors office. First and foremost, a patients privacy to their body is THIER right. If a doctor wants happy patients, they will seek to make them comfortable in an exam. The solution: I am very sure a young female scribe has "ears". and therefor, she could be placed in a position in the exam room where her eyes cannot ponder a male patients private parts and still be able to take notes. Screens, drapes etc can be used. In my opinion, if a male patient has modesty, and doesn't want his body to be viewed by a scribe, then that doctor should do everything possible to seek his wishes. If the doctor has the attitude of the male doctor you spoke of below, then perhaps he shouldn't be doing male exams, and forcing the patient to be exposed to someone that makes him feel uncomfortable. Enough is enough of the biased form of forced male exposure in exam rooms. All of the men in these comments complaining about a woman in the room observing them exposed while his doctor examines him have directed their anger at female doctors. But nothing has been said about male doctors who do nothing different. Jesse Stone says male patients wishing to avoid the embarrassment of having a woman seeing them naked should only see male doctors. I submit doing that guarantees no such thing. A 2017 article in BizWest ("Doc gets more patient time with scribe at the keyboard") discusses the increasingly use of scribes (basically a glorified note taker who will very likely be a young woman) being in the room while a patient is examined. The article, with photos, shows an attractive young woman in her early to mid 20s working in the office of Dr. John Bender. The articles states: Bender often fields colleagues’ questions about scribes, such as, “Will you excuse a female scribe when doing sensitive work on a male patient?” He answers, “No, I don’t.”
Name: 
Jim
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
I have no desire to ever see a female doctor. Rather than seeking the best and the brightest Medical schools seem to have quotas of men and women along with political agendas that make me very concerned about the new crops of young doctors. Already over 1/3 of all doctors are women and now more women attend medical school than men. I think we need legislation to guarantee men the right to a male doctor and not force female doctors on men who don't want them.
Name: 
charles brown
Email: 
ceb348@yahoo.com
Charlie, I think you will find that most of the men who come here, might be perfectly fine with a "female" Doctor initially. The problem I see with most is men are not provided a chaperon of his gender. I would ask any Female Doctor who comes here if they know of any MALE doctors, who will pull in male a chaperone or male nurse, so there are 2 males in the exam room where the female patient has to expose her private areas to 2 men in the room. My guess is the answer would be an absolute NO! So the question is to ask is, then why in the hell would a Female Doctor feel that a man should have to undertake having 2 females in his exam during a prostate or frontal exam? Often most when this situation happens, the Female Doctors will step out, and without warning ask another female in to observe as a Chaperone. 99% of the time he will not be asked. It just happens, and I'm betting the Female Doctor is crossing her fingers hoping he will not reveal he is embarrassed, or has modesty, and wants it respected and will say no. The more men who "take it" and don't say a word, walking out feeling strange and angry, the more it will keep happening over and over.
Name: 
Jim
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
Charles, you said "I think we need legislation to guarantee men the right to a male doctor and not force female doctors on men who don't want them." Please enlighten us as to which health insurance plans do this. That way the men who don't want to be "forced" to see female doctors would know which health insurance plans to avoid.
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
Charlie, didn't Obamacare screw up the health care system enough? Do we really need MORE legislation? If you want a male doctor, go to a male doctor! It really is that simple. If more doctors in the future tend to end up women that's because they're the ones electing to go to medical school in greater numbers than ever before. Just how do you suppose your 'legislation' is going to address that? Set a cap on women applicants? Set a quota for male applicants? Maybe if Putin ever takes over for Trump his apparatchiks can dictate what jobs people must accept or train for. But at least right now in America women AND men have a choice what profession they want to enter without laws dictating what they must do.
Name: 
PV
Email: 
phillip.virgencito@mail.com
PV, even if the majority of men decide to go to a male doctor, it still wont help him from being exposed, with the greater number of nurses being female. Try as a man, to go to an ultra-sound center, to get a male tech available to do your testicle ultra-sound. Males are non existent, all the while the OVER whelming majority of Breast exam centers BOAST an ALL female staff for breast exam procedures. Ultimately modesty is not see as "that important" to give men the choice to have the gender they want in exams rooms, in particular same gender chaperones, yet you will never EVER see an exam where there are a male doctor and male nurse or male chaperone, where the patient is female. Its really something that female doctors will subject a male patient to another female in his exam, think nothing of it, yet don't feel it appropriate for 2 males in an exam room with a female patient. I see no difference. Modesty is modesty.
Name: 
Jim
Email: 
jimpatdoyle@gmail.com
PV, that was my whole point, "if a guy prefers a male doctor, go to one". And the point i made of male and female patients being treated equally is spot on, if female patients don't want men in the room, they don't have to have one in the room. Men can choose to not have females in the room too, these ARE valid points/arguments, to say they're not is like saying its fine to treat one gender worse than the other, just like what's happening now and the whole point of this discussion. Seemed that a lot of guys here were being ambushed with females in the health care system. I couldn't figure out how they didn't know beforehand who would be the attending doctor before they showed up and have the right to say who can be in the room and who cannot. It would seem that females in the health care system are the ones being attacked here but with all due respect to the issues, they are the ones purposely or inadvertently acting inappropriately by not gaining the consent first of the male patient before the procedure starts. I don't know about you but I suspect that the majority of men aren't good with others ignoring the fact that men want to have their dignity, respect, and modesty recognized also. You don't mind female health care providers? Good for you, that's your preference and what you're comfortable with. That's also one of the points in this discussion, preference. Some men aren't comfortable with that and that's their preference but that's not the main issue here in this discussion, it's all about how they were treated during a visit by female heath care providers.
Name: 
Jesse Stone
Email: 
Jesse.stone307@yahoo.com
Definitely not- they are indifferent to men's problems or suffering and treat circumcision like a sport
Name: 
opt out
Email: 
optout@gmail.com
I wonder...instead of blaming the male patient for his reaction to a female doctor, and maybe the ambush of her female chaperone...am bush, funny word...I wonder if maybe, just maybe, there is anything about the way a female doctor interacts with a male patient, especially an older male patient...could there be no awkward extra effort at asserting authority? Are all female doctors robotically unaffected by age and gender variants? Could there be no discomfort or awkwardness felt AND PROJECTED by the young female doctor...that immediately becomes apparent to the male patient? Why does this author assume that ALL female doctors interact in EXACTLY the same way with patients of either gender? Sexism, writ large, in reverse.
Name: 
Henry Counselor
Email: 
flat5sub@gmail.com
At my female dermatologist exam the female chaperone faces the wall not watching the exam. She works on her laptop and is there if she is needed. She is taking notes I believe. Doctor is very good at keeping me covered. Had 3 exams there and all the same. My wife says at her gyno exams there is someone else in the room just listening not watching.
Name: 
BILL
Email: 
bill021@yahoo.com

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Are male patients comfortable with women doctors?